LinkedIn Has A New Competitor?

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Facebook began letting businesses in the US or Canada post jobs and take applications from job seekers, posing a challenge to Microsoft-owned LinkedIn.

The platform’s users will be able to find help-wanted posts at business pages on Facebook or by looking in a new ‘jobs’ bookmark on the leading social network’s mobile application.

“Businesses and people previously use Facebook to fill and find jobs, so we’re rolling out new features that permit job posting and application directly on Facebook,” the California-based internet giant said in an online message.

Job postings may appear in news feed streams if companies pay to endorse them.

Clicking on an “apply now” button will open an online form already filled out with relevant information from a person’s Facebook profile, according to the social network.

Facebook Partners With Game Engine Unity

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Facebook announced its partnership with game engine Unity for streamlining the process of exporting and publishing games from Unity onto Facebook. Developers have until August 31 to apply for an alpha version of the export tool, permitting them to build and export games from Unity to the Facebook app, which reportedly hosts around 650 million gamers each month.

Majority Indians support FB’s Free Basics: TRAI

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Facebook is calling on Indian users to send an email to the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI), asking the government agency to support its Free Basics program. The campaign, which shows up when users sign onto the social media platform and includes a pre-filled form so they don’t even have to write an email, has already proven controversial, with opponents saying its message undermines net neutrality in India.

Free Basics, which became available throughout India last month, is a program by Facebook initiative Internet.org to provide basic Internet services, like search, Wikipedia, health information, and weather updates, for free to all users. While it sounds altruistic, Free Basics has the potential to drive reams of traffic to sites from certain providers (including Facebook) at the expense of others, which violates the principles of net neutrality. The TRAI plans to hold a public hearing on net neutrality next month.

India is currently Facebook’s second-biggest market after the U.S., with 130 million users, and many net neutrality advocates believe that its campaign is another example of how the company is misusing its size and influence to form the opinions of Internet users in emerging economies.